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Do Work and Relationships Mix?

Sometimes working relationships become that little bit more.

It's one of the biggest questions that a lot of people can relate to. For a lot of people, no matter where you work, a work relationship can develop into something more. So, the question you have to ask yourself then: Is it going to work? After looking at my friends' experiences, along with my own experience, I can positively say that it's not just a yes or no answer.

First off, it takes two strong willed people to make that work relationship. Stay strong. Sometimes it can prove hard or there are days where you feel like throwing in the towel because of people interfering, but the main thought you must keep in your mind is that you both care about each other, so it's no one's business except your own. Most of the people you work with will want to talk about how it's going or be nosy—this is the point where you turn round and say, "It's none of your business" and walk on. Sometimes one of the two are stronger than the other. This may be because they've worked there longer than their partner so they know the staff a bit better. The main act here is to make sure the other is comfortable.

The main experience that my friends and I have is that when it's a work relationship, it's seldom just you and your other half. There are a lot more people included. A lot of coworkers will think it's perfectly acceptable to interfere by joking around or constantly asking questions about how the relationship is going. Most of them are genuine people that care, but others interfere out of spite or jealousy. Their main goal is to make you feel as awkward as they possibly can. So, depending on the type of people you are, you can definitely use this to your advantage because, without knowing, they've given you quite a bit of power. The first play could be acting like they've genuinely broken you two apart, potentially making them feel bad and apologise. Or the second play would be to show that their words haven't bothered either of you and show how much you don't care by carrying on as usual.

The majority of my friends at work try their best to support my decision on seeing someone that I work with, but they can only take your confidence in the relationship so far. They are there to make sure that every time you doubt yourself because other people have been making fun or making the relationship difficult, there are people out there that are rooting for both of you. They listen to your problems, hold you when you cry, and hold you back when you're angry. If it wasn't for them, I wouldn't have the confidence to try and maintain a relationship at work. So keep your work friends close. They can help make or break the relationship!

There will be some rough days if you're on shift together—that's a given. If a colleague has said the wrong thing at the wrong time, an atmosphere could build, resulting in the potential couple giving each other the silent treatment until either the shift ends or who ever caused the tension leaves. End of the day, you have to keep reminding yourself that your other half does care about you and that it's just a rough day and nothing else.

It can become overwhelming if you both work at the same place and then go home and share the same living space, too. It's almost like you need a break from each other, only you can't because you see each other both at work and home and it can potentially get a bit too smothering. If that happened, personally I'd try and find a new job or try to move to a different part of the company. That way, you do get that break in between and you'll appreciate the time you spend together at home a little bit more.

Not everyone is cut out to be in a work relationship. It takes time and effort and compromise from both the couple and the staff. My last word would be don't let the work environment dictate what your relationship should be. If you're happy, then that's the main thing!

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